Creating a Positive Picture of Pregnant & Parenting Teens

What we think and how we feel about something has a lot to do with how it is presented—or framed. For example, think about particularly lively children and how our reactions might differ if we call them “curious,” as opposed to “hyperactive.” Teen parents have been labeled many things since the mid-1970s, and most of the labels have not been positive. Healthy Teen Network wants to change this. As the only national organization focused on this population, we have spent a great deal of time and resources exploring why teen parents have such negative frames and how we might alter those frames. Join us to recall a bit of history as it relates to current frames for this population, explore current frames, and discover which popular frames may in fact perpetuate current stereotypes and what you can do to change your framing language and gain support for pregnant and parenting teens nationwide. 

This resource is a previously recorded webinar (05/07/2015), facilitated by Pat Paluzzi and Gina Desiderio.

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Changing Our View of Adolescent Health

The frame with which we view issues affecting teen health and well-being defines our language and informs our responses.  When teen pregnancy is considered a disease that must be prevented, we think of interventions that affect individual behavior, and we think of teen pregnancy as an individual failure. This kind of thinking promotes a culture of blame. When we view pregnancy prevention as a social justice issue with public health ramifications, we look beyond individual prevention efforts to a more systemic response. Likewise, our view of poverty can often be that it is too big for us to address and that the condition of poverty is due to some lacking on the part of the individual. This kind of thinking can prevent a response at the level with which poverty and its effects can be mitigated. What does it look like when we view "teen pregnancy prevention" through a social justice lens? How do we move beyond the disease/prevention model which places blame? And how do we ensure that we remain inclusive, positive, and empowering? Join us while we take a more in-depth look to define, discuss, and explore what it means to employ a Youth 360° approach.

This resource is a previously recorded webinar (08/05/2015), facilitated by Pat Paluzzi and Valerie Sedivy.

Access to this resource is available to exclusively to membersOther resources are open access for the field at large. 

Addressing the Sexual Risk Behaviors of System-Involved Youth

All young people experience important developmental milestones on their path to becoming healthy adults, and while this time of change is full of promise, it can also be a time of increased vulnerability or risk. For system-involved youth (e.g., youth in child welfare or juvenile services), navigating this time of change can be fraught with even more challenges or barriers. Without strong family and social networks, they may face increased risk of engaging in high-risk behaviors—such as unprotected sex and sex with multiple partners—as well as unintended pregnancy, HIV, and other sexually transmitted infections.

This resource is a previously recorded webinar (01/26/2017), facilitated by Nadine Finigan-Carr, PhD, of the University of Maryland School of Social Work.

Access to this resource is available to exclusively to membersOther resources are open access for the field at large. 

What can be done to ensure youth who identify as LGBTQ+ are being treated with respect and dignity by health center staff and providers while receiving sexual and reproductive health services? Tons! Review some LGBTQ+ language, meet Aliyah and Jamell, two adolescents who identify as LGBTQ+, and start action planning!

Access to this resource is available to exclusively to membersOther resources are open access for the field at large.

This is the test course for the elearning units created for the University of Maryland, Baltimore Ruth Young School of Social Work. 

This course has restricted access.

What can be done to ensure youth who identify as LGBTQ+ are being treated with respect and dignity by health center staff and providers while receiving sexual and reproductive health services? Tons! Review some LGBTQ+ language, meet Aliyah and Jamell, two adolescents who identify as LGBTQ+, and start action planning!

This course has restricted access, as part of the U Choose project in Baltimore City.